The Victory Binding of the American Woman's Cookbook

Other headings in this section of the cookbook include the following:

THE RETURN OF THE SOUP KETTLE

The family soup kettle comes back into its own with the returning necessity for using every bit of food that enters the kitchen and the reduced supply of canned soups.  Practically all leftovers except sweets may go into the soup kettle.  When making stock use the bones from steaks, chops and roasts, ham bones, the gristly end of the tongue, carcasses of roast poultry and poultry feet.  Drain all vegetable liquor as well as the liquid from canned vegetables into the soup kettle...

USE THE MORE PERISHABLE MEATS

Smoked meats and the larger cuts of fresh meats can be shipped to the armed forces.  Besides the smaller cuts the more perishable parts of the animal - liver, sweetbreads, kidneys, heart and tripe - are left for those on the home front.  This is no hardship but a distinct advantage, for these parts contain more vitamins than those that we are more accustomed to using and since there is no waste they cost less.

HAVE POULTRY FREQUENTLY

Poultry contains practically the same nourishment as meat.  It is likely to be plentiful, it has always been raised by women and is not easily shipped... Make soup stock from poultry feet or carcass of roast fowl.  Combine poultry meat with vegetables, rice, hominy or noodles in scalloped dishes and stews.

FISH AND SEA FOOD ARE PLENTIFUL

There will probably be no shortage of fish or sea food.  Some fish which are caught long distances from shore and fish which can be salted and shipped to the armed forces may be less plentiful but there is usually an abundance of fresh water fish to take their place.  Free use of fish is a national economy since they live on food not suitable for human consumption.  They are a home economy because there is very little waste and they require only a short cooking period.  Save fat by serving fish broiled, baked, poached, or boiled, rather than fried.

EGGS ARE VALUABLE FOOD

Eggs are valuable sources of proteins, iron, vitamins A, B, and D; use them freely as long as their cost is reasonable.  Only the usual seasonable fluctuations in price are expected but if large amounts are dried and shipped abroad, they may become too expensive to use freely except as entrees...

CHEESE IS AMERICAN

American cheese manufacturers are producing many of the types of cheese formerly imported from Europe.  Some of the harder cheeses are being shipped to the armed forces but the softer cheeses are likely to be plentiful.  The high protein, mineral and vitamin content of cheese makes it an excellent alternative for meats that are limited for home use...

SAVE ALL FATS AND OILS

Save every ounce of fat; use what you need for cooking and take the rest to your meat dealer, who will pay you for it.  These reclaimed fats are not used for food but in the manufacture of munitions and soap.  Fat to be sold to the meat market must be clear and free from water or other liquid.  Keep a container near the stove with a fine wire strainer in the top.  Pour melted fat through the strainer to remove bits of meat or crumbs...  While fats are so vitally needed for defense the patriotic American homemaker will use them sparingly for deep fat frying and will make meant loaves instead of croquettes, cookies instead of doughnuts.

SIMPLE DESSERTS

Elaborate desserts are out of place in wartime; use fresh fruit or crackers and cheese frequently.  Simple desserts such as custards, ice creams, steamed puddings and fruit cobblers may be made with an equal amount of extracted honey, brown sugar, maple sugar, corn sirup or maple sirup instead of white sugar.  Omit half the liquid in the recipe when using honey, corn sirup or maple sirup...

PIES ARE STILL POSSIBLE

The substitute for pie when fats need to be conserved is the fruit-filled yeast coffee cake.  Fats rendered at home can be used for pastry.  Chicken and bacon fat are preferable to fats from seasoned roasts...  Prunes, raisins, dates and figs are rich in natural sugars and may be used as long as they are available.  Extracted honey, corn sirup, brown sugar, molasses or sorghum may be used when available to sweeten both cream and fruit fillings...

CANNING JAMS, JELLIES, PRESERVES AND PICKLES

The family with its own garden will want to use every available method to preserve for future use what they do not consume at once.  Most vegetables and fruits may be canned, pickled or preserved in some form...

The following scans were furnished by Carolyn Scott of Auburn, Washington.

This Christmas each of my grandchildren (all but one married with children) are getting a bit of their family history, in the form of a cd containing over 1000 recipes, collected and hand-written by my grandmother, between the years of 1942 and 1948. She recorded them during the "War years," so there are a number of the recipes that reflect the rationing rules in place. Of course, none of my grandchildren have the first clue about 'rationing' so I thought inclusion of some basic information about rationing would be interesting.  My purpose in tackling this project is two-fold; first is to share this bit of family history with my grandchildren, but just as important, I believe, is to preserve these pieces of my grandmother's life for posterity, for its own value to me. It is inevitable that sometime in the future the cards will be disposed of by someone.

[They] ...did include a recipe referencing 1918, and may really have come from that period of time, but I can't verify it's actual age. I do know and can verify that the recipe project I'm working on were recipes written on the 5"x8"cards during the time period 1942 and 1948 regardless of their original date. The cards were kept in boxes my grandmother got in exchange for coupons from Porter-Scarpelli Macaroni Company in Portland, Oregon. The offer was carried in the Portland newspapers in 1942, and my grandmother passed away in 1948, so the time period of the preparation of all the recipe cards is defined by those two years.

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